Subscribe to
our newsletters

Subscribe to our newsletters!

Subscribe to our newsletter and get the latest news from the Nordics straight to your inbox.

Search in Nordic Life Science Insight

-
May 15, 2019
NDA

Why should you engage early with regulators and HTA bodies?

In this white paper NDA’s Dr Mira Pavlovic-Ganascia and Claes Buxfeldt provide insight into the reasons to seek scientific advice and elaborate on what the expected outcomes of constructively engaging with regulators and HTA bodies could be.

Why should you engage early with regulators and HTA bodies?

In this white paper NDA’s Dr Mira Pavlovic-Ganascia and Claes Buxfeldt provide insight into the reasons to seek scientific advice and elaborate on what the expected outcomes of constructively engaging with regulators and HTA bodies could be.

-
NDA
-
May 15, 2019


In Europe there are many routes to gain scientific advice directly from official authorities. National regulatory advice is a routine practice of most regulatory agencies, as well as of the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

Scientific advice in the HTA arena is more recent. In this context, national HTA advice is provided against the backdrop of country or region-specific policies and legal requirements. Early dialogue involving multiple HTA bodies is also rather recent, provisioned in the context of the European Network of Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) Joint Action 2 as well as specific actions financed by the European Commission (SEED)(ref) and involving both EMA and EUnetHTA. Indeed, in recent years, EMA and EUnetHTA have led several combined regulatory-HTA pilots to get experience both on the process and the content of such an exercise (1,2,3).

Since the creation of our NDA Joint Advice service offering in 2011, the NDA Advisory Board has also conducted numerous such projects for clients, focusing on ensuring a thorough understanding of the varying regulatory and HTA requirements and bridging the relative efficacy – relative effectiveness gap.

The means to gain scientific advice are many and diverse, but so are the reasons companies strive to get it.

Why seek scientific advice?

The combined scientific advice/early dialogue processes allow a company to engage relatively early in discussions with regulators and HTA bodies. The label on the tin indicates that the main interest of such an engagement would be to gain scientific input into the development program of a product to be able to steer it away from regulator, HTA and payer pitfalls and towards rapid patient access.

The scientific input usually covers the proposed study design(s), comparators, endpoints, target study population and inclusion criteria’s, study length and other key aspects important both for regulatory and HTA bodies. More in general, this early discussion will allow a company to check if the evidence to be generated for EMA is relevant for HTA submissions.

Asking for a combined regulatory and HTA advice is even more important in cases where treatment guidelines are weak or inexistent and/or there is no relevant HTA decision available in the field of interest.

Reality, however, is even more diverse than this and the reasons and rationales for companies to go for scientific advice therefore vary greatly.

1. Stake holder engagement

Engaging early with regulators and HTA bodies can be a crucial motivation for engaging in the scientific advice process, as it provides a unique opportunity to introduce these two key stake holders to the science and circumstances behind the company’s product. This can benefit the process in two ways:

  1. In any future engagements the regulators and HTA bodies will know the product/technology and targeted patient population better. This will potentially enhance future interactions and remove communication hurdles.
  2. By engaging with the right individuals in the right agencies, interest in the product can be sparked which can lead to constructive and positive input along the product’s development path. Building rapport with assessors are again an important vehicle to friction less communication.

2. Demonstrating progress

Engaging with external experts in a structured manner is also an excellent way to demonstrate to boards and stake holders that the product is progressing through the development process. Constructive feedback from regulators and HTA bodies can help steer the product development but can also be a value driver for the company.

If this is a main driver for expert engagement or seeking scientific advice, other reasons should also be carefully considered to optimize the value of the interaction. Seeking endorsement for the sake of it is rarely the optimal use of the time spent by external experts or regulatory agencies and HTA bodies.

3. Compliance

Many multi-product pipeline companies have highly controlled processes for how to progress products through the development process. This may well include the consideration and execution of a formal scientific advice procedure.

As this reason is not a value driver in itself, the reasons that the company put this requirement in place in the first instance should be carefully considered when running through the motions. Teams following a check list risk missing the underlying strategic reasons for why the process is necessary and may therefore not consider alternatives or options that might fit better or add more value.

4. Internal alignment

Although not its primary purpose, internal alignment is an incredibly valuable potential outcome of any scientific advice/early dialogue process. Teams working towards a clear goal along a clear timeline tend to glue together and more easily visualize the ultimate outcome. At NDA Group we’ve seen many occasions where the formal process has created strong composite teams. These teams are primed to progress the product through development with a determination and shared purpose that would not have been possible without the structure and clear goal that the scientific advice process offers.

Achieving internal alignment should therefore always be considered a potential beneficial outcome and should be planned for accordingly.

Read the full white paper here

Don’t miss the opportunity to hear to Dr Mira Pavlovic-Ganascia and Claes Buxfeldt speak about HTA and Europe at our complimentary seminar:  Optimizing Value – Regulatory and Market Access Considerations in Stockholm on the 21st May.

Last updated:
July 11, 2019

NDA

NDA is a world leading drug development consultancy with a dedicated team of over 150 consultants supported by an expert network and a specialist Advisory Board. Our goal is to streamline drug development in order to accelerate patient access to important medical therapies.

Click here to read more about us!


In Europe there are many routes to gain scientific advice directly from official authorities. National regulatory advice is a routine practice of most regulatory agencies, as well as of the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

Scientific advice in the HTA arena is more recent. In this context, national HTA advice is provided against the backdrop of country or region-specific policies and legal requirements. Early dialogue involving multiple HTA bodies is also rather recent, provisioned in the context of the European Network of Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) Joint Action 2 as well as specific actions financed by the European Commission (SEED)(ref) and involving both EMA and EUnetHTA. Indeed, in recent years, EMA and EUnetHTA have led several combined regulatory-HTA pilots to get experience both on the process and the content of such an exercise (1,2,3).

Since the creation of our NDA Joint Advice service offering in 2011, the NDA Advisory Board has also conducted numerous such projects for clients, focusing on ensuring a thorough understanding of the varying regulatory and HTA requirements and bridging the relative efficacy – relative effectiveness gap.

The means to gain scientific advice are many and diverse, but so are the reasons companies strive to get it.

Why seek scientific advice?

The combined scientific advice/early dialogue processes allow a company to engage relatively early in discussions with regulators and HTA bodies. The label on the tin indicates that the main interest of such an engagement would be to gain scientific input into the development program of a product to be able to steer it away from regulator, HTA and payer pitfalls and towards rapid patient access.

The scientific input usually covers the proposed study design(s), comparators, endpoints, target study population and inclusion criteria’s, study length and other key aspects important both for regulatory and HTA bodies. More in general, this early discussion will allow a company to check if the evidence to be generated for EMA is relevant for HTA submissions.

Asking for a combined regulatory and HTA advice is even more important in cases where treatment guidelines are weak or inexistent and/or there is no relevant HTA decision available in the field of interest.

Reality, however, is even more diverse than this and the reasons and rationales for companies to go for scientific advice therefore vary greatly.

1. Stake holder engagement

Engaging early with regulators and HTA bodies can be a crucial motivation for engaging in the scientific advice process, as it provides a unique opportunity to introduce these two key stake holders to the science and circumstances behind the company’s product. This can benefit the process in two ways:

  1. In any future engagements the regulators and HTA bodies will know the product/technology and targeted patient population better. This will potentially enhance future interactions and remove communication hurdles.
  2. By engaging with the right individuals in the right agencies, interest in the product can be sparked which can lead to constructive and positive input along the product’s development path. Building rapport with assessors are again an important vehicle to friction less communication.

2. Demonstrating progress

Engaging with external experts in a structured manner is also an excellent way to demonstrate to boards and stake holders that the product is progressing through the development process. Constructive feedback from regulators and HTA bodies can help steer the product development but can also be a value driver for the company.

If this is a main driver for expert engagement or seeking scientific advice, other reasons should also be carefully considered to optimize the value of the interaction. Seeking endorsement for the sake of it is rarely the optimal use of the time spent by external experts or regulatory agencies and HTA bodies.

3. Compliance

Many multi-product pipeline companies have highly controlled processes for how to progress products through the development process. This may well include the consideration and execution of a formal scientific advice procedure.

As this reason is not a value driver in itself, the reasons that the company put this requirement in place in the first instance should be carefully considered when running through the motions. Teams following a check list risk missing the underlying strategic reasons for why the process is necessary and may therefore not consider alternatives or options that might fit better or add more value.

4. Internal alignment

Although not its primary purpose, internal alignment is an incredibly valuable potential outcome of any scientific advice/early dialogue process. Teams working towards a clear goal along a clear timeline tend to glue together and more easily visualize the ultimate outcome. At NDA Group we’ve seen many occasions where the formal process has created strong composite teams. These teams are primed to progress the product through development with a determination and shared purpose that would not have been possible without the structure and clear goal that the scientific advice process offers.

Achieving internal alignment should therefore always be considered a potential beneficial outcome and should be planned for accordingly.

Read the full white paper here

Don’t miss the opportunity to hear to Dr Mira Pavlovic-Ganascia and Claes Buxfeldt speak about HTA and Europe at our complimentary seminar:  Optimizing Value – Regulatory and Market Access Considerations in Stockholm on the 21st May.

Last updated:
July 11, 2019

NDA

NDA is a world leading drug development consultancy with a dedicated team of over 150 consultants supported by an expert network and a specialist Advisory Board. Our goal is to streamline drug development in order to accelerate patient access to important medical therapies.

Click here to read more about us!